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THE GAMUT 


AND 

Time-Table i 

IN VERSE. 


FOR 

THE INSTRUCTION OP CHILDREN. 


Br C. FINCH. 


EMBELLISHED WITH TWELVE ILLUSTRATIVE COLOURED 

engravings. 


PRINTED FOR 

A. K. NEWMAN AND Co. LEADENHALL-STREET. 


PRICE ONE SBILUNG» 









































































































THE GAMUT IN VERSE. 



Said Ann to her sister Maria, one day, 

If you wish it, my dear, I will teach you 
to play; 

I’ll hear you your notes each day, if you’re 
good, 

And make them quite easy to be understood. 

But first you’ll observe, what is clear to 
be seen. 

Those five straight black lines, and four 
spaces between, (1) 































































































11 



Of the Alphabet next, seven letters you 
see, 

The names of the notes, from A unto G. 
And now we’ll begin with first reading the 
Bass, 

From G, on the first line; and A, the first 
space, ( 2 ) 


I 


































■Iky. y 














. 

~ { d V- 






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. *->y . . \ y ypt •- 

i'. , .'-t, .:i| :;i.: -V. ;■. 


h ■! 


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1 -■ ■. •'.■ ^ 

■ ’ ‘::'’..i 7i.';rr t'fU^' 

% 

, ^ {Uti 

.• v; .77 !.'.v Jni .''j j:; vri 1; il!';-} tD-’ffv tuT 

: 

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[4 



The second Jine next, pray take notice, 
is B; 


The space called the second, which follows, 
is C; 

Which brings you to D, which is on the 
third line. 

With E, the third space, pray remember 
next time; 

































16 



Then comes F, on the fourth line, and G, 
the fourth space; 

If attention you pay, you’ll get on apace, 
And soon all the notes you will quite rightly 
call. 


Up to A, the fifth line, and last of them 
all. 





























































































19 



And here ends the Bass, which at present 
you’ll learn, 

And we’ll afterwards take the Treble in 
turn. (3) 


Here the first line is E, and F, the first 


A 


I 

I 


space, 

And G, on the second line, next takes a 
place. 


















































22 


























With F, on the fifth line; so do not forget 
This lesson of lines and of spaces I’ve set, 
Which when you’ve repeated as well as 
you’re able^ 

We’ll pass to the next rule, they call the 


Time-table. 





















































; ; ; ... ^ i[ 





26 



Those notes which above and below you 
discover, 


Are called Ledger lines, both higher and 
lower; (4) 

But at present you’ll have no occasion to 
learn ’em. 

When you have, I’ve no doubt, you will 
quickly discern ’em. 






































LEDGER LINES. 

























































Qt 



(i.; ; ^ ,, 

. . :..-v; c*;hLii '.'J : iuui ivrtA 

(c) ,v?-..;v 

.’u,<-j •:;i:.iii^ , ...I :..^-.'i i:iLf ti>T 


















30 



There’s the Semibreve, longest and slowest 
of all, (5) 


Which is equal to those two, which Minims 
we call, (6) 

And four Crotchets here are presented to 
view, (7) 



To equal in value those last Minims two. 












































TIME-TABLE. 


(3) 


( 6 ) 




( 7 ) 


( 8 ) 


—-i—! - !-~l~ 


(9) 




i ( 10 ) 




































































































4 c- 


C’ . 


>■' ^•’■ ' . ‘ u' *' 


/ - \ 


^ -V f 

‘ ‘t 




r-r 

>f7:nrl r. '■ V•^'^TO'/^r^r * 

(•n ;r- 


nit; ;<.■■'‘ ^ ’ «-r.r ’vhnf* r:[. ?. 


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34 



Then the eight Quavers next, which here 
you may see, (8) 

Will with those four Crotchets exactly 
agree. 


And of Semiquavers sixteen in number are 
wanted, (9) 

To equal those Quavers, which last you have 
counted j 






















35 



Then of Deniisemiqavers, thirty-two in 
aline, (10) 

With the ten and six Semiquavers make 
even time. 

Now, my dear, when this table you quite 
understand. 

You may venture to take some new music 
in hand. 

And knowing so well your ambition to play, 

I will give you a pretty new lesson one day. 


Dean and Mandajr, Priatertt Threadneedle-StreeC. 









































































Cic 

KT 

,FC 

1 









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Gamut and Time-Table in Verse; for the Instmctidn of Children 
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